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Awards

Student Grants

Midwest PARC offers a travel grant to students to help offset transportation costs associated with participation in herpetological fieldwork with an experienced researcher. In 2021, 12 grants ($100) were awarded to students across the Midwest region! See below for application details and to read reports submitted by prior grant recipients.

We are no longer accepting travel grants for the 2021 season.

Stay tuned for future award information!

MW PARC Student Travel Grant
Spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) by M. Youngquist.

Eligibility: Applicants must be an enrolled student (high school, undergraduate, or graduate) in good standing (≥ 3.0 GPA) or have graduate within 1-year of the application submission date and conduct herpetological fieldwork in the Midwest US with a researcher. Only U.S. Citizens or resident aliens are eligible due to federal regulations.

Applications: An application form that includes the student's name, address, contact information, and school information shall be required. In addition, the student shall provide a brief (one paragraph) explanation of the work they will participate in that the award will help support, the number of anticipated field visits, and total mileage. Each application must also include the name and contact information of the researcher(s) the student will be working with and affirmation from the researcher(s) stating they agree to work with the student, can confirm good academic standing, and is supportive of the student's application for a MW PARC Fueling Student Field Experiences grant.

Awards: Each award will consist of a $100 award to be used by the student to offset transportation costs associated with their participation in the project. The number of awards will be decided by the MW PARC Co-Chairs based on available resources each year.

Nathan georeferencing a crayfish burrow.
2021 Recipient: Nathan Barnett

Click here to read about Nathan's work with massasaugas, crayfish burrows, and Snake Fungal Disease.

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles. 

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2021 Recipient: Michelle Souza

Click here to read about Michelle's project which investigates genetic diversity and habitat isolation in a peripheral population of marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum).

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles. 

Brenna smiling infront of a harmful algal bloom.
2021 Recipient: Brenna Friday

Click here to read about Brenna's research with Green Frogs and harmful algal blooms.

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles. 

Bradley sitting on the forest floor measuring a box turtle.
2021 Recipient: Bradley Johnson

Click here to read about Bradley's work with box turtles in Indiana.

 

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles. 

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2021 Recipient: Paolo Speziale

Click here to read about Paolo's work with amphibian and invertebrate larvae in ephemeral wetlands in Illinois.

 

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles. 

Danielle wearing chest waders holds up two plastic bags containing tadpoles.
2021 Recipient: Danielle Galvin

Click here to read about Danielle's work with amphibians and ranavirus. 

 

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles. 

Scholarship recipient Katie Brandewie holding a common snapping turtle
2021 Recipient: Katherine Brandewie 

Click here to read about Katie's work with turtle communities in a large urban wetland complex in Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

 

Note: Details regarding field sites have been removed to protect those populations of amphibians and reptiles.